David  J. Eggebeen 

photo of David  Eggebeen

Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, and Sociology

Contact Information

304B Health & Human Development East
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA 16802

814-865-2655

(fax) 814-863-7963

e5x@psu.edu

Research Interests

My research involves three topics: patterns of intergenerational exchanges of support in American families; the role of values, especially religious values in the family formation processes of young adults; and the implications of fatherhood for men. My work on intergenerational ties in American families began with documenting the extent, correlates and measurement of routine assistance flows between aging parents and their adult children. Currently, along with Steve Zarit and Karen Fingerman from Purdue University, I am examining the interconnections between psychological processes and patterns of support across three generations of families. I have also been involved in a project investigating family formation behavior among young adults headed by Nancy Landale of Sociology. My work has been investigating the role of religious beliefs and behavior in adolescence on the subsequent likelihood and timing of marriage and cohabitation. Finally, I am examining the consequences of fatherhood on men where I have been addressing such questions as: How does becoming a father or engaging in fathering activities change or affect men psychologically and socially? Affect their family ties? Affect their work and career behavior?

Education

B.A., 1975, Sociology, Calvin College
M.A., 1981, Sociology, Rutgers University
M.A., 1984, Sociology, University of North Carolina
Ph.D., 1986, Sociology, University of North Carolina

Specializations

1987-1995: Member, Program Effectiveness Panel, U.S. Department of Education

1991: Member, Nominating Committee, Family Section, American Sociological Association

1994: Chair-Elect, Sociology of Children Section, American Sociological Association

1995: Chair, Sociology of Children Section, American Sociological Association 

Professional Experience

1993-present: Associate Professor of Human Development and Sociology; Senior Research Associate, Population Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University

1986-1993: Assistant Professor of Human Development; Research Associate, Population Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University

Selected Publications

Dew, J., & Eggebeen, D.J. (2010).  Beyond the wage premium: Fatherhood and men’s economic well-being. Research on Human Development. (forthcoming).

Eggebeen, DJ, Dew, J., & Knoester, C. (2010). Fatherhood and men’s lives at middle age. Journal of Family Issues, 31, 113-130.

Eggebeen, D.J. (2010). Do fathers matter uniquely for adolescent well-being? In Gender and Parenthood, edited by Kathleen Kovner Kline and W. Bradford Wilcox. New York: Columbia University Press.

Eggebeen, D.J., & Dew, J. (2009).  The role of religion in adolescence for family formation in young adulthood. Journal of Marriage and Family, 71,108-121.

Amato, P.R., Landale, N.S., Havasevich-Brooks, T.C., Booth, A., Eggebeen, D.J., Schoen, R., & McHale, S.M. (2008).  Precursors of young women’s family formation pathways.  Journal of Marriage and Family, 70: 1271-1286.

Davey, A., Eggebeen, D. J., & Savla, J. (2007). Parental marital transitions and support between generations: Looking within the family longitudinally. In T. Owens & J. J. Suitor. Advances in Life Course Research. New York: Elsevier Science.

Eggebeen, D. J. (2005). Cohabitation and exchanges of support. Social Forces. 83, 1097-1110.

Eggebeen, D. J. (2002). The changing course of fatherhood: Men's experiences with childen in demographic perspective. Journal of Family Issues, 23, 486-505.

Eggebeen, D. J., & Knoester, C. W. (2001). Does fatherhood matter for men? Journal of Marriage and the Family, 63, 381-393.

Eggebeen, D. J., & Davey, A. (1998). Do safety nets work? The role of anticipated help in times of need. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 60, 939-950.

Strategic Themes

  • Contexts and Social Institutions