Research Faculty with HDFS Appointments

  • Michael Cleveland, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor, College of Health and Human Development, and Faculty Affiliate, The Methodology Center and the Prevention Research Center. Application of advaced statistical methods to substance use prevention reserach. mjc37@psu.edu
  • Donna Coffman, Ph.D. (Quantitative Psychology), 2005, University of North Carolina, Research Associate Professor, College of Health and Human Development, and Principal Investigator, The Methodology Center. Advancing and applying statistical methods to address complex research questions in the behavioral, health, and social sciences. My background is in structural equation modeling, measurement theory, and mixed effect models, particularly in assessing model fit. More recently, I have focused on methods for causal inference including propensity scores, and mediation. dlc30@psu.edu
  • Kelly Davis, Ph.D. (HDFS), 2008, Penn State, Research Assistant Professor of HDFS, and Research Associate in the Center for Healthy Aging. Family dynamics and parent and child development and well-being; daily family experiences; parenting; family diversity; socialization; Implications of work conditions and experiences for family relationships and individual and family members’ health and well-being, career development, work-family policies and practices; workplace diversity; transition to adulthood, midlife. kdc156@psu.edu
  • Celene Domitrovich, Ph.D. (Psychology), 1998, Penn State, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center. Prevention programs and curriculum, health promotion. cxd130@psu.edu
  • Elia Femia, Ph.D. (Human Development and Family Studies), 1998, Penn State, Research Associate, HDFS. Alzheimer's disease caregiving; evaluation of dementia-care programs; disability processes in the oldest-old. exk12@psu.edu
  • Mark Feinberg, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology), 1998, George Washington University, Research Professor, Prevention Research Center, College of Health and Human Development. Family process (coparenting, parenting, sibling relations) and development, prevention, biology and behavior (genetics, affective neuroscience, stress-related hormones). mef11@psu.edu
  • Damon Jones, Ph.D. (Quantitative Methods), 2002, Vanderbilt University, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center. Statistical analysis/research methods, Quasi-experimental research designs, longitudinal data, economic evaluation, program evaluation, prevention research. dej10@psu.edu
  • Stephanie Lanza, Ph.D. (Human Development and Family Studies), 2003, The Pennsylvania State University, Scientific Director and Senior Research Associate, Methodology Center, and Research Associate Professor, College of Health and Human Development. Research methods; finite mixture models including latent class analysis and latent transition analysis. SLanza@psu.edu
  • Kimberly Mallett, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology), 2005, University of Washington, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center. Developing and evaluating interventions aimed at reducing high-risk drinking and related consequences among college students; prevention of skin cancer among high-risk populations; enhancing communication between physicians and patients and the impact of doing so on behavior change among patients. Email:kam54@psu.edu
  • Meg Small, Ph.D. (Quantitative Methods and Health Policy), 1992, University of Maryland, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center. Understanding factors that allow organizaions to successfully adopt and sustain evidence-based interventions; Developing and testing methods that allow organizations to use data when making programmatic decisions. mxs693@psu.edu
  • Janet Welsh, Ph.D. (Developmental Psychology), 1994, Pennsylvania State University, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center. Early language development and its relationship to social competence, and the impact of various aspects of the school ecology on students’ behavioral and academic adjustment. jaw900@psu.edu