Student Involvement in HDFS and the College

On this page you will find information about CHHD Student Organizations, the HDFS Undergraduate Student Organization, Volunteering opportunities, On-campus living environments, and the Study Abroad Program.

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College of Health and Human Development Student Organizations

Dean's Student Advisory Committee on Minority Affairs (SACOMA)

This committee gathers information about the academic and non-academic climate for minority students in the college, recommends steps to address those areas and assists the implementation of related programs in the college. Any HHD student may join. Contact Joyce Hopson-King, Director, Office of Diversity Enhancement Programs, juh4@psu.edu, 215 Henderson.

Women's Leadership Initiative

The College of Health and Human Development provides opportunities to foster professional development skills among its women students through the Women's Leadership Initiative. See their website for more information about becoming involved with this highly successful initiative.

Health and Human Development Honor Society

This Society is open to any undergraduate student in the College with a 3.3 GPA or higher. Letters of invitation are sent to eligible students each fall. The Society has regular meetings throughout the year and sponsors a variety of service projects. For more information, please contact the Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Outreach, 814-865-1427.

Health and Human Development Student Council

The purpose of the Council is to represent the HHD student body to the Dean and faculty. The Council's activities are geared toward developing cooperation, communication, and unity, as they represent student interests. All students in HHD are automatically members of the Student Council. For more information, contact the Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Outreach, 814-865-1427.

Kappa Omicron Nu

HDFS, HR&IM, and NUTR majors of at least fourth semester standing and a 3.2 minimum GPA are invited to join this national honor society in family and consumer sciences. The society was formed to encourage excellence in scholarship and research. Meetings and projects reflect the interests of the members. A $300 scholarship is awarded annually to a local chapter member. For more information on the Kappa Omicron Nu Honors Society please refer to the Kappa Omicron Nu national website or contact the local Omicron Tau Chapter.

Human Development and Family Studies Student Organization

Undergraduates are encouraged to join the HDFS Undergraduate Student Organization (USO). The USO represents undergraduate interests to the Department and provides opportunities for leadership development, opportunities to work with faculty, informational programs, community service, and lots of opportunities to do something constructive for HDFS and yourself.

Volunteering: An Essential Experience

The job market is so competitive that it is important for you to gain experience by volunteering. All volunteer experience can be used on your résumé. Future employers will view your volunteer experience as valuable work experience which may give you an advantage over another applicant without experience. Volunteering can be a way to give service to others while adding to your record of experience.

Many volunteer opportunities are available in Centre County . Consider programs offered by the Center for Student Engagement in leadership development and service leadership/volunteerism. Volunteer opportunities can be specifically geared toward student interests, including HealthWorks (863-0461, Room 201 Student Health Center). Another resource is your adviser. You can also pursue volunteer experiences during summers in your local community.

Special On-Campus Living Environments

Another way for undergraduates to get involved is to live in a special living environment on campus. The following are only two examples of a variety of special living environments. For information on all the special living options on campus please check at Residence Life's Living Learning Communities page.

Health Education and Awareness in Living (HEAL)

The HEAL House is a special living environment for those students who are interested in healthy living. This house is a combination of the Wellness House and Health and Human Development House. Healthy living is comprised of a balance of the following six components: physical, emotional, social, academic, spiritual, and intellectual well-being. The house helps students maintain this balance through experience and education. The HEAL House is located on the second floor of Beaver Hall in the Pollock residence hall area. For more information contact Residence Life.

Helping Across the Community (HAC)

“Serving to Learn, Learning to Serve” is their motto. The HAC House students believe that student lives and the community are enhanced through Service Learning and Service Leadership. This house sponsors and participates in many different service projects, food drives, recycling, blood drives, Habitat for Humanity, Dance Marathon, Alternative Spring Break, Second Mile and many more projects. Students of all majors are encouraged to join the house. HAC House is located on the first floor of Beaver Hall in the Pollock residence hall area. For more information, contact Residence Life.

Study Abroad

Education abroad is an excellent opportunity to increase awareness of the richness and variety of different cultures by living and studying in another country. As our world becomes more and more interdependent, the need for better understanding is increasingly necessary. Education abroad is an opportunity to enhance your understanding of other cultures and to prepare for living in the global community. HDFS Undergraduates currently have the opportunity to study abroad in Rome for HDFS course credit. More information can be found at the HDFS Penn State Study Abroad website.

Also, Penn State offers over 130 education programs in 49 countries. With careful planning, you may be able to apply the credits gained abroad toward general education requirements, electives, or a minor. Sometimes, depending on the course contents, credits earned abroad may be applied toward supporting courses within the major. Plan early in your program for education abroad and work closely with your adviser and the University Office of International Programs. If you are interested in a study abroad program you need to contact the University Office of Global Programs, 410 Boucke Building, 865-7681.